"Patience People"

There is an old Appalachian Carol we don’t often sing, but you can find it on page 210 of our red hymnal, it’s entitled “I Wonder as I Wander.”  The carol speaks of one that is wondering (questioning) as he wanders (walks aimlessly), out under the night sky.  He wonders why Jesus came to die for ordinary people like you and like I.  Many of us probably ask this question on a daily basis as we look upon the sinful nature of ourselves and troubling and dark events in the world around us.   The song continues to state that Jesus could have surely had anything because he was the King, yet he chose you and he chose I.  As we enter 2020, our wondering about why God came for you and for I will continue, but our wandering should certainly end!

It’s perfectly fine to wonder about the mystery of our divine God from time to time, and why things happen the way they do. It’s also more than perfectly fine to stand in wonder and amazement in the love shown at Bethlehem, yet if you truly believe you shouldn’t be wandering aimlessly in the night.  Yes, wandering seems to be a big problem in our world today.  We wander away from what is right, we wander away from our responsibilities, we wander in confusion, and we wander because we are lost.  However, a true believer should wonder, but never wander.  Even among those who claim to believe in that Jesus that came to save you and to save I, many seem to be wandering.   Wandering away from church, wandering without the guidance of the Holy Spirit (or at least not listening to the call of the Spirit), and wondering away from the true purpose of God’s word of love (using scripture to hurt and judge, not to heal and express grace).

Are you a believer? Do you find yourself wandering from time to time?  Perhaps in 2020 you need to wander your behind back into a pew, maybe you need to listen closer to the Spirit, and use the word of God to strengthen yourself and others in Christ.  I think it’s time for all of us to stop complaining about what we don’t have, stop being divided on everything, and stop hurting one another.  Instead let us stand in “wonder” of the power of the Holy Spirit and in joy for the gift of the Manger and the Cross!  Let us live this NEW YEAR in a NEW WAY, in wonder, but not wandering out under the night sky!

There is an old Appalachian Carol we don’t often sing, but you can find it on page 210 of our red hymnal, it’s entitled “I Wonder as I Wander.”  The carol speaks of one that is wondering (questioning) as he wanders (walks aimlessly), out under the night sky.  He wonders why Jesus came to die for ordinary people like you and like I.  Many of us probably ask this question on a daily basis as we look upon the sinful nature of ourselves and troubling and dark events in the world around us.   The song continues to state that Jesus could have surely had anything because he was the King, yet he chose you and he chose I.  As we enter 2020, our wondering about why God came for you and for I will continue, but our wandering should certainly end!

It’s perfectly fine to wonder about the mystery of our divine God from time to time, and why things happen the way they do. It’s also more than perfectly fine to stand in wonder and amazement in the love shown at Bethlehem, yet if you truly believe you shouldn’t be wandering aimlessly in the night.  Yes, wandering seems to be a big problem in our world today.  We wander away from what is right, we wander away from our responsibilities, we wander in confusion, and we wander because we are lost.  However, a true believer should wonder, but never wander.  Even among those who claim to believe in that Jesus that came to save you and to save I, many seem to be wandering.   Wandering away from church, wandering without the guidance of the Holy Spirit (or at least not listening to the call of the Spirit), and wondering away from the true purpose of God’s word of love (using scripture to hurt and judge, not to heal and express grace).

Are you a believer? Do you find yourself wandering from time to time?  Perhaps in 2020 you need to wander your behind back into a pew, maybe you need to listen closer to the Spirit, and use the word of God to strengthen yourself and others in Christ.  I think it’s time for all of us to stop complaining about what we don’t have, stop being divided on everything, and stop hurting one another.  Instead let us stand in “wonder” of the power of the Holy Spirit and in joy for the gift of the Manger and the Cross!  Let us live this NEW YEAR in a NEW WAY, in wonder, but not wandering out under the night sky!

Pastor Brady

   

 

 

  

 

     

 

The Cold November Rain
     The month of November seems like the calm before the storm, when it comes to the church calendar and changing weather. Yes, we can have early snowfall and the temperatures begin to drop significantly, but the big storms generally come much later. Yes, we have special events in the Church in November, we celebrate the Saints that have passed on this year to be with the Lord, we celebrate Thanksgiving, and we begin the Advent Season on the last Sunday of the month, but December is truly the busy time in the Church and for most seasonal family celebrations and activities as well. Yet, you can sense the change in people’s moods as the Christmas season approaches, for better or for worse, and the changes in the nature, the cooler air, barren trees, and cold November rains have an impact as well.
     Yes, I stole the title for this post “Cold November Rain,” from the 1992 Hard Rock Ballad by the band “Guns and Roses” entitled “November Rain”. This song is the typical Rock Ballad with long dramatic chords and guitar solos, coupled with lyrics about a tragic struggle with love and lost love. I actually listened to the song and it reminded me of how some may feel this time of year. Many feel and embrace this season with love and happiness with the thought of Thanksgiving and Christmas approaching. Some will have thoughts of wonderful times with family and friends, special services at the church, and decorating for the season. However, at the same time many feel loss and pain, stress levels rise, schedules become packed, some are experiencing brokenness, some do not have a family to celebrate the season with, and others may not have strong connections to a church family or to God. This year the cost of everything will burden families even more than in the past. The cost for those experiencing loss of friendships, relationships, and loved ones will be even higher than the current cost of living.
     When the cold November rains fall do we recognize the hurt, the pain, and the suffering of those around us? As the season of family and joy approaches are we prepared to deal with the lonely, the lost, and the broken hearted? As the Church, and as children and disciples of the most high, we are called to reach out to those in the greatest need of our love and attention, and those in the greatest need of hearing the story of the loving grace of Jesus Christ. As we prepare to be Thankful this month, and as we look to the promise of the Advent Season, let us also be a family of God that reaches out to the lost, the fearful, and the sorrow filled like never before. Those we know of in our Church Family and Far Beyond!
     May we realize God’s Love and Light always shines through the loneliness and pain: “Cause nothin lasts forever, even Cold November Rain”

                                        In the Peace and Love of Christ,
                                        Pastor Brady